Frustration is a Stepping Stone Towards Learning

IMG_3932

Most people who have been showing horses for quite a while know that feeling: You have been preparing it for weeks, taken – what feels like – all of your money, and packed your whole stuff into several bags and suitcases. No, we are not talking about someone who is fleeing the country, just about traveling to a horse show. And in the end, you are there and everything went wrong. You have made mistakes, the horse has been “offline” or the judge simply did not appreciate your performance. In short: It feels like it was all for nothing. If you are a long-time competitor, you might be used to that feeling by now, but for most newcomers the disappointment is huge if something went wrong. But, even those who have been competing for years do feel that disappointment from time to time. Some of them told us, how they manage to cope with frustration at the show.

Franziska Hampf & Time For A New Page; picture: The Showlife
Franziska Hampf & Time For A New Page; picture: The Showlife

Franziska Hampf

TSL: How do you react, if you know you or your horse have made mistakes during the class?

FH: I know this situation so well! Especially, in the Hunter Under Saddle, me and my horse’s opinions are sometimes deeply divided. Fortunately, I have a great trainer who is always watching me closely and giving me feedback right after the class. Whenever I am really mad after a class, he brings me back down to earth. He tells me what I have done wrong and what I can learn from my mistake. This is what I would recommend to newcomers: Ask someone to take a video during the class and talk about it afterwards. Practice and be better next time. From my experience I can tell that most of the time when we had a bad run, it has been entirely my fault. That can be depressing, but it actually just shows me how much I still have to learn. And if I feel better at the next show, I know that I have learned from my mistakes.

TSL: What if you feel like you had a great run, your trainer and friends praise you, but the judge is of a different opinion and does not place you?

FH: It is frustrating if the judge does not appreciate your performance. If it is a rather unimportant class, I usually think “Nevermind!”, because to me it is more important that my horse is listening and my trainer is content. If something like that happens during the finals of the European Championship, it is – of course – a different matter. Luckily, this has never happened to me, but I would be so mad! To understand the judges decision, I usually study the score sheets after the class. Especially score sheets for Showmanship can be interesting, because I feel like judges can decide very subjectively. Most of the time, the little comments in the right colon, can tell a lot about the judge’s decision. If I cannot read those “hieroglyphs” written on the score sheet, I’ll ask the judge in person. In case I still cannot understand his or her decision, I can simply be frustrated for one night and grumble about the judges… 😉

Sabrina Hoppert with Hes A Hollywood Cody & Hot In My Heart; picture: Stefanie Krause Fotografie
Sabrina Hoppert with Hes A Hollywood Cody & Hot In My Heart; picture: Stefanie Krause Fotografie

Sabrina Hoppert

TSL: How do you react, if you know you or your horse have made mistakes during the class?

SH: By now, I am actually able to cope with frustration really well, but it took me a while? Why? Because I think that defeats are part of success. I actually use every defeat to learn and improve my skills. I analyze videos after each class and really “search” for mistakes. Was it my fault or the horse’s? In the best case, I let my trainer analyze the run. Thereby I can avoid future mistakes or work on my faults during training. In my opinion, it is important to view each defeat as a chance to improve – my skills and my horse’s! As Malcom S. Forces once said: “Victory is the sweetest if you’ve know defeat.”

TSL: What if you feel like you had a great run, your trainer and friends praise you, but the judge is of a different opinion and does not place you?

SH: That is frustrating for sure! I think it happens a lot. That is why I think that you need to define “success” for yourself. Is it the placing? Or is success if I am happy with my run and there is hardly anything to improve? To me success is the feeling of leaving the arena being happy with my own and my horse’s performance. Therefore success is more than a trophy to me! I actually have to think of a quote by an American motivational speaker: “You are the only person to stop yourself from something permanently. Everyone else can only stop you for a while.” I think this really fits the horse show world.

Lisa Georgi & Hotroddin Invitation; picture: private
Lisa Georgi & Hotroddin Invitation; picture: private

Lisa-Marie Georgi

TSL: How do you react, if you know you or your horse have made mistakes during the class?

LMG: I think we all know that feeling: Everything works out perfectly fine in the warm-up pen, but as soon as the class starts everything goes awry. Even though you might be frustrated it is for the best if you analyze your run calmly and try to find out why it went wrong. Maybe you have spent too much or not enough time in the warm-up pen, you were not concentrated… The most important thing is not to be frustrated for too long! Concentrate on the next class and stay motivated!

TSL: What if you feel like you had a great run, your trainer and friends praise you, but the judge is of a different opinion and does not place you?

LMG: Yes, that happens a lot as well. If it is a championship, it can be really frustrating, but I think that it is more important to be happy with the run. I have become German Champion in Western Riding with an average run – I actually was not happy with my pattern at all! On the other hand, there were classes in which I had a great feeling, but was not placed. I think it is part of the competition to swallow a defeat from time to time. Judges are just humans and can be wrong. You should, however, not change your style in order to impress a certain judge – stay true to yourself!

Nicole Steinbrecher with Liddys Lena & Dreams Tonite; picture: Fotostudio A Focus
Nicole Steinbrecher with Liddys Lena & Will Be Famous; picture: Fotostudio A Focus

Nicole Steinbrecher

TSL: How do you react, if you know you or your horse have made mistakes during the class?

NS: My most important rule is: I do not compete against others, but against myself. Am I able to present what we are capable of? At any show, the circumstances are a lot different than at home. I know my own and my horse’s strengths and weaknesses – if I am not happy, I need to ask myself some questions:

Was I unsure about the pattern? If so, I have to learn it better, practice more, talk about it with my trainer! It is my job to know my pattern by heart, because it gives me confidence and makes me and my horse feel safe.

Was my horse listening when I entered the arena? I think we all know that: There is a lot going on before you enter the arena: “Let me pull your chaps down, your phone is ringing, do you need something, hurry up…!” It is my job to have everything ready to show ten minutes before the class starts. Thereby I am able to concentrate more. If I am not able to make my horse listen before the class, I must not be surprised if it is “offline” during the run.

Are we capable to perform every maneuver? If not, I know what to practice at home. You cannot expect everything to work out perfectly fine just because it is showtime.

TSL: What if you feel like you had a great run, your trainer and friends praise you, but the judge is of a different opinion and does not place you?

NS: I always let somehow record my runs, I watch them afterwards and compare them to the scoresheet – while doing that you might recognize one or another mistake you were not aware of before. If I am still unsure about the placing, I will ask the judge. Always remember: Those judges are people like you and I with individual taste and preferences. Nevermind a judge’s mistake, stay motivated, it is your turn next time! Your horse does not care about a placing anyway – it is only able to feel whether you are happy or not!

 

Thank you for your honest answers, girls!


Wir alle kennen das: Man bereitet sich wochenlang vor, plündert das Konto und packt alles ein, was man hat. Nein, die Rede ist nicht davon, sich ins Ausland abzusetzen, sondern lediglich davon, auf ein Turnier zu fahren. Und teilweise steht man am Ende da und nichts lief, wie es sollte. Man hat selbst Fehler in der Prüfung gemacht, das Pferd war mal kurz offline oder der Richter hat nicht so platziert, wie man sich das vorgestellt hat. Kurzum: Am Ende fühlt es sich an, als war das ganze Investment, finanziell und zeitlich, für die Katz. Was für alte Hasen fast schon normal ist, ist für Neueinsteiger oftmals eine Herausforderung: Gerade, wenn man noch nicht so lange dabei ist, ist die Enttäuschung oft umso größer. Aber auch die, die seit Jahren in der Szene zuhause sind, sind ab und an enttäuscht von ihrer Leistung. Einige von ihnen haben uns verraten, wie sie mit Frustration auf dem Turnier umgehen.

Franziska Kampf & Time For A New Page; Bild: The Showlife
Franziska Kampf & Time For A New Page; Bild: The Showlife

Franziska Hampf:

TSL: Wie gehst Du damit um, wenn du weißt, dass du in der Klasse einen Fehler gemacht hast?

FH: Ich kenne die Situation nur zu gut – gerade in den Hunterklassen gehen die Meinungen von mir und meinem Pferd oft auseinander. Allerdings habe ich das Glück, einen super Trainer zu haben, der meine Shows mit Adleraugen verfolgt und mir direkt im Anschluss Feedback gibt. Wenn ich vollkommen verärgert aus der Prüfung gehe, holt er mich immer recht schnell auf den Boden der Tatsachen zurück. Er sagt mir, was falsch war und was ich für die nächste Show daraus lernen kann. Genau das würde ich auch Turnierneulingen empfehlen: Lasst euch von euren Freunden filmen und besprecht nach jeder Show, was gut war und was ausbaufähig ist. Übt es und macht es das nächste Mal besser. Aus meiner Erfahrung weiß ich, dass es meistens mein Fehler ist, wenn mein Pferd in der Show nicht gut läuft. Das ist deprimierend, aber es zeigt mir, wie viel ich noch zu lernen habe. Und ein besseres Gefühl bei der nächsten Show zeigt, dass man aus allen Fehlern lernen kann!

TSL: Und wenn du mit Deiner Leistung und Deinem Pferd zufrieden warst, Trainer und Freunde den Run loben und der Richter das aber anders sieht und Dich nicht platziert?

FH: Es ist natürlich ärgerlich, wenn die Leistung des eigenen Pferdes von den Richtern nicht in dem Ausmaß gewürdigt wird, wie man es sich erhofft. In kleineren, „unwichtigeren“ Klassen finde ich es halb so wild, da ist es für mich das Wichtigste, dass mein Pferd auf mich hört und mein Trainer mit uns zufrieden ist. Anders ist das natürlich, wenn man sich im EM-Finale ungerecht behandelt fühlt. Mir ist das zum Glück noch nie passiert, aber ich würde mich grün und blau ärgern. Um die Richterentscheidungen besser verstehen zu können, schaue ich mir gerne die Score Sheets nach den Klassen an. Gerade die Showmanship Score Sheets sind interessant, da sie je nach Richter sehr unterschiedlich sein können. In den Kommentarzeilen kritzeln die Richter gerne unleserliche Hieroglyphen, die aber oft sehr aufschlussreich sind. Wenn meine Phantasie zum Entziffern nicht ausreicht, gehe ich zum entsprechenden Richter und sie geben gerne Auskunft – vorausgesetzt sie können ihre eigene Schrift noch lesen. Wenn ich dann immer noch nicht verstehen kann, warum ich so schlecht platziert worden bin, bleibt nichts anderes übrig als einen Abend schlecht gelaunt zu sein und mit Verbündeten auf die Richter zu schimpfen…

 

Sabrina Hoppert mit Hes A Hollywood Cody und Hot In My Heart; Bild: Stefanie Krause Fotografie
Sabrina Hoppert mit Hes A Hollywood Cody und Hot In My Heart; Bild: Stefanie Krause Fotografie

Sabrina Hoppert:

TSL: Wie gehst Du damit um, wenn du weißt, dass du in der Klasse einen Fehler gemacht hast?

SH: Mit dieser Art der „Niederlage“ komme ich inzwischen – nach einiger Arbeit – sehr gut klar. Warum? Weil ich der Meinung bin, dass Niederlagen einfach zum Erfolg dazugehören. Genauer gesagt, nutze ich inzwischen jede Niederlage, um daraus zu lernen und besser zu werden. Ich analysiere nach meinem Start jedes Video und suche ganz objektiv die „Fehler“. Lag das Problem bei mir oder bei meinem Pferd? Woran lag es genau? Im besten Fall lasse ich das Video auch von meinem Trainer analysieren und spreche unseren Ritt oder Lauf nach jedem Start durch. Nur so kann ich diese Fehler beim nächsten Mal verhindern oder im Training weiter daran arbeiten. Wichtig ist meiner Meinung nach dabei, die Fehler beziehungsweise die Niederlage als Chance zu sehen  – als Chance, sich und sein Pferd zukünftig noch weiter zu verbessern! Frei nach Malcom S. Forbes: „Der Sieg schmeckt am süßesten, wenn du die Niederlage kennst“.

TSL: Und wenn du mit Deiner Leistung und Deinem Pferd zufrieden warst, Trainer und Freunde den Run loben und der Richter das aber anders sieht und Dich nicht platziert?

SH: Natürlich ist es extrem ärgerlich, wenn man selbst – und auch Außenstehende mit dem Ritt/Lauf zufrieden sind und der Richter das Ganze total anders sieht. Das ist in meinen Augen sehr frustrierend und kann leider häufig vorkommen. Deshalb ist Erfolg meiner Meinung nach immer eine Frage der Interpretation. Bin ich erfolgreich, wenn ich gut platziert werde? Oder bin ich auch dann erfolgreich, wenn ich mit meinem Ritt/Lauf zufrieden bin und kaum etwas verbessern könnte? Für mich ist Erfolg auf dem Turnier, wenn ich mit einem zufriedenen und glücklichen Gefühl aus der Klasse gehe und sowohl mit mir, als auch mit meinem Pferd völlig zufrieden bin. Erfolg ist für mich deshalb mehr als nur ein Pokal! Außerdem muss ich in solchen Situationen immer an das Zitat eines amerikanischen Motivationstrainers denken: „Du bist der einzige Mensch, der dich auf Dauer von etwas abhalten kann. Andere können dich nur vorübergehend stoppen.“ Und so ist es auch im Turnierreitsport.

Lisa Georgi und Hotroddin Invitation; Bild: privat
Lisa Georgi und Hotroddin Invitation; Bild: privat

Lisa-Marie Georgi

TSL: Wie gehst Du damit um, wenn du weißt, dass du in der Klasse einen Fehler gemacht hast?

LMG: Jeder kennt es: Auf dem Abreiteplatz klappt alles und in der Prüfung geht es dann schief. Auch wenn man sich danach über den Fehler ärgert, ist es am besten, wenn man in Ruhe den Ritt analysiert und man selbst merkt, woran es lag,  z.B. an zu kurzem oder zu langem Abreiten, ungenügender Konzentration oder wenn man schon über dem letzten Hindernis mit der Pattern abhakt. Das Wichtigste in dem Moment ist, dass man sich nicht länger über diesen Fehler ärgert, sondern sich auf die nächsten Prüfungen konzentriert und motiviert bleibt!

TSL: Und wenn du mit Deiner Leistung und Deinem Pferd zufrieden warst, Trainer und Freunde den Run loben und der Richter das aber anders sieht und Dich nicht platziert?

LMG: Ja, das passiert schon manchmal. Wenn es eine Meisterschaft ist, ist es natürlich dann schon ärgerlich, aber das Wichtigste ist, dass man selbst mit dem Ritt zufrieden ist. Ich bin schon mit einem relativ durchschnittlichem Ritt Deutscher Meister in der Western Riding geworden, obwohl ich gar nicht zufrieden war. Und genauso wurde ich schon mit einem sehr guten Ritt nicht mit vorne platziert. Das wegzustecken gehört nunmal zum Sport dazu. Richter sind eben auch nur Menschen. Man sollte seinen Reitstil aber deshalb nicht dem jeweiligen Richter anpassen, sondern seiner eigenen Linie treu bleiben.

Nicole Steinbrecher mit Liddys Lena und Dreams Tonite; Bild: Fotostudio A Focus
Nicole Steinbrecher mit Liddys Lena und Will Be Famous; Bild: Fotostudio A Focus

Nicole Steinbrecher

TSL: Wie gehst Du damit um, wenn du weißt, dass du in der Klasse einen Fehler gemacht hast?

NS: Meine erste und wichtigste Regel an einer Show ist immer:

Ich starte nicht gegen Andere, sondern gegen mich! Bekomme ich es hin, was wir können und trainiert haben?

An einer Show sind die Gegebenheiten wie Umgebung und Stimmung anders als zu Hause. Ich kenne die Stärken und Schwächen von uns als Team, wenn ich also nicht happy bin mit meinem Ritt, muss ich ehrlich mit mir sein:

War ich unsicher in der Pattern? Dann muss ich sie besser lernen, öfters reiten, mit dem Trainer besser besprechen! Es ist alleine mein Job, die Pattern „aus dem FF“ zu beherrschen, was im gleichen Zug mir und meinem Pferd Sicherheit gibt und Ruhe bringt.

War mein Pferd wirklich bei mir, bevor ich in die Prüfung ging?  Jeder kennt das: Alle sprechen noch, bevor man in die Klasse geht: „Ach, deine Chaps sind noch oben, das Handy klingelt, brauchst noch was, schnell schnell, husch husch……“ Es ist mein Job, dass alles ready to show ist und das zehn Minuten vor meinem Start! Somit kann ich mich davor wirklich auf mich und das Pferd konzentrieren. Habe ich die Bindung vor der Klasse nicht hinbekommen, muss ich mich nicht wundern, wenn mein Pferd in der Klasse nicht da ist und nicht zuhört!

Können wir schon alles zeigen was gefragt wird? Wenn nicht, weiß ich, was ich zuhause zu üben habe! Ich erwarte dann nicht, dass es jetzt, weil Show Time ist, einfach aus dem Nichts klappt!

TSL: Und wenn du mit Deiner Leistung und Deinem Pferd zufrieden warst, Trainer und Freunde den Run loben und der Richter das aber anders sieht und Dich nicht platziert?

NS: Ich lasse meine Ritte immer aufnehmen, ich schaue sie mir an und vergleiche sie mit dem Score Sheet – meistens sieht man dann doch noch ein, zwei Sachen. Wenn ich danach immer noch große Fragezeichen im Kopf habe, frage ich den Richter direkt und lasse es mir erklären. Was ich mir immer sage: „Es menschelt überall“, auch wenn das nicht sein sollte, aber es ist so! Jeder hat seinen Geschmack und Vorlieben. Abhaken, weitermachen, das nächste Mal sind wir dran! Und dem Pferd ist es eh egal, was der Richter denkt – Hauptsache, der Reiter war nach dem Ritt happy!

Vielen Dank an Franziska, Sabrina, Lisa und Nicole!

 

Du magst vielleicht auch

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.