Dresscode: Ranch Riding

picture: Equi Shot

Direkt zur deutschen Version

Keep it simple. Keep it “ranchy”. Those were the statements that people told each other in the early years of Ranch Riding. No glitter, no sparkle, no bright colors. But does that mean you cannot be stylish or show your personality through your outfit? No, is the clear statement of the three riders we have talked to. They have told us how they choose their outfits – from a male and female perspective.

Joschka Werdermann

German Open Champion, Americana Champion,
Int. DQHA Champion
Picture: Dead and Alive

When you first heard of the class, did you have a vision of how to dress?

Not really. When AQHA introduced the class in 2012, I did not really recognize it. I started to learn more about it in 2014: When I started working at the Circle L Ranch in Wenden, the class was already quite popular at the shows there. My first classes where with youngsters who should get used to the show chaos. 

How did you pick your first outfit?

In the beginning, my outfit was quite functional: shirt, hat, jeans, maybe chaps. When I realized how much I liked the class, I started to focus on my look a bit more.

Do you have multiple outfits for the class and if so what are they combined of?

Depends. I do have multiple shirts, mostly with a pattern in different shades of brown, grey, black etc. I combine those with jeans, of course. If it is colder, I will add a black felt vest. I like to wear chinks and buckaroo boots because it adds that “ranchy” touch. Chaps are possible as well. I will use a matching blanket – it should match the shirt and the boots – and, depending on the time of year, a straw hat or a felt hat in a darker shade of green. I plan on adding silk scarves to my outfits, combined with a slide of raw hide or a broach. I like that this adds the elegant cowboy chic.

Picture: Luxcompany GmbH

How important is style for you when it comes to Ranch Riding?

Very important. I think it is important to not wear colors that are too bright. Remember that this class resembles the daily work at a farm. I am inspired by the style of the Californian vaqueros and the Cowhorse industry that emerged from that.

A style no-go in Ranch Riding?

Any shirts or blouses with tribals or flags you would never wear, un-shaped hats, chinks that do not cover the knee, wearing chinks without buckaroo boots and not tucking your jeans into the boots, check shirts and bright colors.

What is it like to chose an outfit as a male rider – you do have less things to choose from, right?

I don’t think so. Depending on the event, the only thing we cannot choose from are sparkly jackets, vests etc. The rest stays the same: I can combine different shirts with different blankets, chaps or hats. If you wear high class equipment, there are many little details that make a difference. Personally, I am not too sad that I don’t have to choose from as many colors as the girls do.

Sabrina Heyn

3rd Golden Series Ranch Riding
Picture: Johanna Koch

When you first heard of the class, did you have a vision of how to dress?

Not at all. When I first showed in this class, it was still called Ranch Horse Pleasure. I looked at the pattern and the rulebook, because I was so confused by the term “Pleasure”.

How did you pick your first outfit?

I wore neutral colors, but I figured a rhinestone belt wouldn’t hurt. Luckily, a friend of mine works as a ringsteward quite often and took that belt away, before I could enter the class.

Do you have multiple outfits for the class and if so what are they combined of?

Sure! Starting with the hat: I have two straw hats and a brown felt hat. I don’t like black hats in the Ranch Riding. I have multiple scarves that match my outfit, multiple shirts and blankets. I wear a leather vest with some outfits. I have buckaroo boots, wearing those with a skinny jeans and chinks – I think that’s a fancy look. I have worn bootcut jeans in the past as well. I wear a less fancy outfit at smaller shows and wear the fancier outfits for classes such as the Golden Series RR.

Picture: Johanna Koch

How important is style for you when it comes to Ranch Riding?

I think it is important to meet the criteria of the class, you have to adhere to the rule book. I do like, however, how people still manage to create an individual and pretty look.

A style no-go in Ranch Riding?

A hat that isn’t shaped. A hat is the rider’s business card, it should be shaped and clean. I think low waist jeans aren’t that flattering, because you cannot really tuck in the shirt. Although this class resembles the work at a farm, all your equipment should be neat and clean.

Nina Obermüller

Maturity Reserve Champion, Golden Series Finalist
Picture: Equishot

When you first heard of the class, did you have a vision of how to dress?

A “ranchy” look, neutral colors only. I didn’t know what that meant exactly. I just looked at what the men wore and mixed that with my personal style.

How did you pick your first outfit?

I wore chinks I lent from someone, a Yucca pad I bought from Arne Kühn, a flannel shirt, that created a “ranchy look”. That was my first try – I didn’t know what I was supposed to do, but I knew I had to look “ranchy”.

Do you have multiple outfits for the class and if so what are they combined of?

I have multiple outfits by now. It starts with one piece, then I add the blanket and the rest of the outfit should match that. I want to pick up one shade of color in the blanket and have that “Oh, this is simple yet good-looking”-effect. One example would be my look with the jeans jacket. People often compliment me on that one, because it is simple, but it works. It’s kind of a unique characteristic: the girl with the jeans jacket.

Picture: Luxcompany GmbH

How important is style for you when it comes to Ranch Riding?

It is important to me, because it an aspect that defines out sport. This means: Our outfit can resemble our personality, we are not forced to wear the same. We do bring this to the boil in the all-round classes, which is really fun, and I think people who show in Ranch Riding could learn something from that – especially the girls. Take something you know, mix it up differently and create a surprise. You have to stay within the rules, though. I already have a new idea, we will see if it works – at the next show, maybe?

A style no-go in Ranch Riding?

I don’t like it if people wear all-round chaps in the RR. To me, this doesn’t work. I would rather wear no chaps at all, tuck the jeans into the boots and that’s it. Less is more. You can change a horse’s appearance through your look. Look at my grey stallion: He is already quite flashy because of his color, so the challenge is to make him look a little more “ranchy”. He should seem authentic. In the Trail or Western Horsemanship, however, he should look more neat. You cannot change a type of horse, but you can change its look in a way. I don’t know if I always manage to do that, but it is worth a try.

BTW, I am so jealous of Joschka Werdermann’s dark olive-coloured hat. I think that work really well. I also envy the Cinch shirts for me. They are usually held in neutral tones, but with fun pattern. I talk to Eva Hackl at every show and ask her if she has one of those shirts in my size – I would love to have something like that in a more feminine shape. Dear designers, please create something like that – I would buy it right away!


So kleidet man sich für die Ranch Riding

Einfach und “ranchy” soll es sein. Kein Glitzer, keine zu bunten Farben. Das waren die Hauptaussagen, die man in den Anfangszeiten der Ranch Riding hörte und auch heute noch hört. Denn laut Regelbuch ist beispielsweise Glitzer am Outfit oder Equipment nicht gern gesehen. Aber heißt das, dass man keine eigene Note ins Outfit bringen darf und nicht kreativ sein kann? Nein, ist die klare Antwort unserer drei Interviewpartner – sie schildern aus männlicher und weiblicher Perspektive, wie sie ihr Outfit für die Ranch Riding auswählen.

Joschka Werdermann

German Open Champion, Americana Champion,
Int. DQHA Champion
Foto: Dead and Alive

Als du das erste Mal von der Klasse gehört hattest, hattest du da schon eine konkrete Vorstellung im Kopf, was man tragen sollte? 

Noch nicht so richtig. Als die Klasse 2012 bei der AQHA heraus kam, habe ich sie nur am Rande mitbekommen. Erst ab 2014 habe ich mich näher mit der Klasse beschäftigt. Als ich nach meinem Pferdewirtschafts-Studium anfing, auf der Circle-L-Ranch in Wenden zu arbeiten, war die Klasse schon sehr präsent auf den dortigen Turnieren. Meine ersten Starts waren mit Jungpferden, die wir angeritten hatten und die an das Turniergeschehen heran geführt werden sollten. 

Wie hast du dein erstes Outfit ausgewählt? 

Bei den ersten Starts war ich eher pragmatisch ausgestattet: Hut, Hemd, Jeans, eventuell Chaps. Als ich mit der Zeit feststellte, dass mir die Klasse gut liegt und ich mich weiter damit beschäftigen wollte, arbeitete ich auch an einer professionelleren Austattung. 

Hast du verschiedene Outfits für die Klasse und wenn ja, wie setzen sich diese zusammen? 

Naja, wie man’s nimmt. Wenn unterschiedliche Hemden als verschiedene Outfits zählen, dann ja! Grundsätzlich habe ich mehrere gemusterte Hemden in gedeckteren Farben, die ich alle für die Ranch Riding nehmen kann, dazu natürlich Jeans. Je nach Temperatur kommt eine schwarze Filzweste dazu. In den meisten Fällen trage ich Chinks mit hohen Buckaroo Boots, das gibt dem Outfit noch einmal einen spezifischeren Ranch Look. Chaps sind allerdings genauso möglich.  Dazu kommt ein Blanket passend zum Hemd und zu den Buckaroos und, je nach Kalender, ein dezent gemusterter Strohhut, oder ein grünlich-erdfarbener Filzhut. Was ich persönlich auch sehr chic finde, aber noch nicht in mein Outfit aufgenommen wurde, sind Seidenscarves mit entsprechendem Slide aus Rohhaut oder einer Brosche. Die geben dem Outfit noch einmal zusätzlichen eleganten Cowboy-Chic. 

Foto: Luxcompany GmbH

Wie wichtig ist dir Stil in der RR? 

Sehr würde ich sagen! Wichtig finde ich, insgesamt eher gedecktere, natürliche Farben zu verwenden. Der Arbeitscharakter, den die Disziplin verlangt, sollte im Outfit aufgegriffen werden. Hier orientiere ich mich gerne am Stil der kalifornischen Vaqueros und der daraus entstandenen Cowhorse-Szene. 

Was ist ein Style-No-Go für dich? 

Irgendwelche Hemden oder Blusen mit Tribals, Flaggen oder Ähnlichem, die man sonst niemals mehr anziehen würde, schlecht geshapte Hüte, Chinks die nicht länger sind als bis zum Knie, Chinks ohne Buckaroo Boots und Jeans über dem Schaft, Karo-Hemden und Neon-Farben. 

Wie beurteilst du das Thema „Outfitwahl“ generell aus einer männlichen Perspektive – ihr habt ja meist nicht so viel Auswahl?

Das würde ich jetzt nicht so sagen. Unabhängig von der Disziplin fällt ja eigentlich nur die Bling-Bling Geschichte bei Jackets, Westen etc. weg, der Rest bleibt ja gleich. Ich kann genauso unterschiedliche Hemden mit passenden Blankets kombinieren und mit Hut und Chaps abrunden. Wenn man sich da mit hochwertigen Ausstattungen beschäftigt, kommen da schon viele Details, die einen Unterschied machen. Dass dabei die Farbpalette vielleicht nicht ganz so ausgereizt wird wie bei den Mädels, finde ich persönlich nicht so schlimm.

Sabrina Heyn

3rd Golden Series Ranch Riding
Foto: Johanna Koch

Als du das erste Mal von der Klasse gehört hattest, hattest du da schon eine konkrete Vorstellung im Kopf, was man tragen sollte? 

Nein, überhaupt nicht. Als ich das erste mal von der Klasse hörte und sie gestartet bin, hieß die Disziplin noch Ranch Horse Pleasure. Ich hab mir das Regelbuch angeschaut und die Pattern, aber das „Pleasure“ im Namen der Disziplin hatte mich maximal verwirrt.

Wie hast du dein erstes Outfit ausgewählt?

Ich hatte mich für meinen ersten Start in dieser damals neuen Disziplin für gedeckte Farben entschieden, hatte mir aber gedacht, ein Glitzergürtel geht schon. Eine Bekannte von mir, die oft als Ringsteward arbeitet, hatte mir diesen dann vor dem Einreiten in die Prüfung abgenommen.

Hast du verschiedene Outfits für die Ranch Riding?

Ja, natürlich. Angefangen beim Hut: Ich habe zwei Strohhüte und einen braunen Filzhut, schwarze Hüte gefallen mir nicht so gut in der Ranch Riding. Dann habe ich verschiedene Halstücher, passend zum Outfit, mehrere Blusen und natürlich Blankets. Zu manchen Outfits trage ich eine Lederweste. Ledergürtel mit Buckle gefällt mir persönlich sehr gut. Ich habe Stiefel mit hohem Schaft, die zu einer Skinny Jeans und Chinks – das finde ich total fancy. Genauso habe ich aber auch schon Boot-Cut-Jeans getragen. Ich habe für kleinere Turniere ein weniger aufwendiges Outfit, als etwa für ein Golden Series Finale.

Picture: Johanna Koch

Wie wichtig ist dir Stil in der Ranch Riding?

Ich finde es schon sehr wichtig, die charakteristischen Merkmale dieser Klasse, auch unter Beachtung des Regelbuches, zu erfüllen. Wenn man sich auf dem Abreiteplatz umsieht, finde ich es auch total schön, zu sehen, wie viele Teilnehmer ihre Outfits doch individuell und schön zusammenstellen.

Ein No-Go?

Ein ungeshapter Hut. Der Hut ist wie in jeder anderen Disziplin auch die Visitenkarte des Reiters und sollte sauber und in shape sein. Low-Waist-Jeans finde ich auch sehr ungünstig, da oft das Hemd herausrutscht. Und auch wenn diese Disziplin auf die Rancharbeit angelehnt ist, sollten das Equipment und die Klamotten des Reiters trotzdem immer sauber und ordentlich sein.

Nina Obermüller

Maturity Reserve Champion, Golden Series Finalistin
Foto: Equishot

Als du das erste Mal von der Klasse gehört hattest, hattest du da schon eine konkrete Vorstellung im Kopf, was man tragen sollte?

Ranchy sollte es sein mit erdigen Tönen… was genau man damit meinte, war nicht ganz klar. Ganz ehrlich, ich habe mir viel bei den Männern abgeschaut und versucht, das mit meinem persönlichen Stil zu mixen.

Wie hast du dein erstes Outfit ausgewählt?

Mein erstes Outfit waren geliehene Chinks, ein Yucca Pad, das ich Arne Kühn abgekauft hatte und welches kurzerhand zum RR-Pad umfunktioniert worden war, weil es den politisch-nicht-ganz-korrekt-aber-jeder-weiß-sofort-was-gemeint-ist „Gebetsteppich-Look“  ausgezeichnet verkörperte, sowie eine karierte Flanellbluse, die den ranchigen Holzfällercharakter unterstrich. Fertig war der erste RR ich-hab-keine-Ahnung-was-ich-da-tue-aber-es-muss-ranchy-aussehen-Versuch á la Nina.

Hast du verschiedene Outfits für die Klasse und wenn ja, wie setzen sich diese zusammen? 

Ja, ich habe mir inzwischen mehrere Outfits zusammengestellt, in der Regel fängt es mit einem Teil an, oft das Pad, und danach stelle ich dann möglichst farblich passend, den Rest des Outfits zusammen, sodass sich zumindest ein Farbton des Pads in meiner Kleidung irgendwie wiederholt oder ich mit dem „Oh das ist eine gute Idee, ist ja ganz simpel“ Effekt kokettiere. Gedacht, getan, bei meinem zweiten Look, der mit der Jeansjacke. Darauf wurde ich schon so oft angesprochen, weil es soooo simpel ist, aber extrem gut funktioniert. Fast schon ein Alleinstellungsmerkmal – die mit der Jeansjacke.

Foto: Luxcompany GmbH

Wie wichtig ist dir Stil in der RR?

Mir persönlich ist er sehr wichtig, weil es uns als Westernreiter ausmacht. Im Sinne von: Wir können unsere Persönlichkeit und/oder unseren Typ damit unterstreichen und sind nicht an einen uniformen Einheitsstil gebunden. Das ist etwas, was ich persönlich ungemein schätze an unserem Sport. Gerade im Allaroundbereich leben wir das ja bis zum Exzess aus, was ungemein Spaß macht, und ich finde von diesem Erfindungsreichtum könnte die RR-Szene, zumindest bei den Mädels, sich noch etwas abkucken. Man muss nur etwas Bekanntes umwandeln, neu zusammensetzen und somit in etwas Überraschendes verwandeln, aber natürlich im Bereich der Disziplinvorgaben bleiben. Ich hab da inzwischen schon eine neue Idee, mal sehen, ob sie funktioniert, vielleicht auf dem nächsten Turnier

Was ist ein Style-No-Go für dich?

Ich persönlich mag es überhaupt nicht, wenn die Allaroundchaps in der RR getragen werden. Das funktioniert in meinen Augen nicht… dann lieber gar keine Chaps, die Hose in die Stiefel gesteckt und fertig. Weniger ist oft mehr. Man kann über die Klamotte und das Equipment ein Pferd zu einem gewissen Maß umstylen.  Nehmen wir etwa den grauen Hengst, der fällt durch seine Farbe ja eh schon auf, die Challenge ist also, ihn in der RR als ein raues Ranchpony wirken zu lassen, sodass man es ihm wirklich „abkauft“, im Trail aber oder in der HMS soll alles eher edel und sortiert oder aufgeräumt wirken. Natürlich kann ich den Typ des Pferdes nicht ändern, aber ich kann doch sehr viel Außenwirkung beeinflussen für die jeweilige Disziplin, also sollte ich mir das zunutze machen. Es lässt sich jetzt darüber streiten, ob mir das immer gelingt. Einen Versuch jedoch ist es wert.

Worauf ich immer noch ungemein neidisch bin ist Joschka Werdermanns Hut in dunklem Oliv, der funktioniert wahnsinnig gut in meinen Augen, und die Cinch-Hemden für Männer. Die haben oft ein geniales Muster in erdigen Tönen. Und bei jeden Turnier aufs Neue laufe ich zu Eva Hackl und frage sie, ob sie endlich eins in meiner Größe hat – extrem cool wäre das noch auf Figur geschnitten….also liebe Designer, wendet Euch doch bitte endlich diesem Thema zu, ihr hättet in mir sofort einen Abnehmer dafür!

Related Posts