How to: Get-Ready for a Class

picture: Sina Thesing

It can be one of the most frustrating things if you are a newcomer: You are early to your class and have to wait for a loooong time. Or worse: You get stressed, because nothing works out as planned and you are late. Scenarios like that are the reason why most big barns have routines – getting ready for a class works like a well-oiled machine. We talked to three Amateur riders on how they handle getting ready for a class.

Christine Gayko

Picture: Jasmin Ziegler Fotografie

What does your routine a day before the class look like?

To be honest, I don’t really have one. It depends on my horse’s mood. If my horse is really relaxed, I try to calm down as well and study my pattern. If the horse is a little excited or spooky, I might work it a little more and concentrate on getting a good feeling for the next day. I usually learn my pattern the day before the class, because it seems like my brain really remembers things after a good night of sleep.

I think we are all a little excited and nervous before a class, so it’s important to reduce any stress. You can do that my putting all things into place, so that you don’t have to search for them. I would try to avoid any actions that put pressure on you. 

In general, I am very relaxed the evening before a class, mainly because I have gained some experience throughout the past years. Anything that happens during the class will happen, you can’t change that the day before the class. Preparation is key and don’t get stressed.

What’s your routine in the barn aisle?

Again, it depends on the horse. Some horses I ride in the morning, some shorter, some for a longer amount of time. I usually work my horse Shiners Hot Chic aka Shiner a little longer than other horses, mainly because he is usually more calm after warming up his muscles quite well.

Other than that, as I said, I try to keep all my things at hand. That way, getting the horse ready won’t take up that much time. Little things can cause stress and result in getting late to the class, such as fixing your number. I try to put my number on my blanket as early as possible. 

It’s important to have good help – hi to all the great equipment managers out there! If you and your team work well together, you know how much time you need to get ready – and that will take away any stress.

What’s your routine in the warm-up pen?

It’s really simple. I really just warm-up my horse and make sure it’s calm and relaxed. Very important: Don’t try to teach your horse new things during the warm-up-time. It won’t understand that and you might cause a bad mood.

My warm-up also depends on the class. For a Ranch Riding, I might ask for some manoeuvres, for a Trail class, I try to work on some poles. That way, the horse knows what to expect. Since Shiner is a little spooky, I try to check on whether there is something in the pen that might scare him. Ideally, I can show that object to him before the class. If I do that, he will be fine. If possible, I walk the pattern before the class. If that isn’t the case, I might watch some other competitors if possible, It helps me to remember the pattern, because you don’t just see it on paper but in real life. If you do all that, you are well prepared. Now go and have fun!


Kendra KöhnenFoto: Christiane Becker

Inhaberin von “Kendra’s”

Jacqueline Korioth

What does your routine a day before the class look like?

We usually try to get an overview who will show when, which horse and in which arena. We also try to make sure that everyone has someone who can help them get ready. We also try to find out our draw number and write it on a whiteboard which is hanging in our barn aisle. That way, everyone can check on draws, classes etc. We try to keep everything on our whiteboard as updated as possible.

Let’s take a Showmanship class for example: The evening before, I usually practice my pattern with my horse Style And Perfection aka Grisu. I wash his tail and fake tail to make sure they are neat and clean. I also rinse off his white legs and hope they will stay that way over night. I also put my number on my jacket.

What’s your routine in the barn aisle?

Whoever in our team is first to show that day, will take care of herself and her horse while the rest of the team feeds the horses and mucks out their stalls. I usually take Grisu out for a moment and check whether I need to lunge him. Afterwards, I clean his white legs again and tie him up in the aisle so that they can dry. Meanwhile, I brush off any dirt, put in the fake tail and do his forelock. As soon as his legs have dried off, I put on hoof clear and might use some touch-up on the white legs. Afterwards, he can stay in the aisle and the hoof clear can dry, while I can a little snack. I check on the time and whether everything is on schedule or delayed. Afterwards, I put on make-up and do my Showmanship bun. In the meantime, one of the girls or my trainer Stefanie Bubenzer will check on Grisu and let him eat some hay, so that he stays happy. I put on my outfit: suit, shirt, scarf and hat. Usually, someone will put the show halter on Grisu and take him out of his stall, so that I don’t get dirty. Afterwards, we go to the warm-up pen, taking our grooming bag with us, which contains our pattern book, something to drink, all sorts of brushes and things you need right before the class.

What’s your routine in the warm-up pen?

The first thing I do is checking which draw is currently showing. That gives me an idea of how much time I have to get ready. I start by walking Grisu around, no chain in the show halter at that point. Afterwards, Steffi and I might watch one or two other competitors and talk about the most important aspects of the class. Then, I put in the chain and pretend it’s show mode. I will work on some transitions at the walk, afterwards at the jog. I might do some elements from the pattern to get in the rhythm. Steffi might correct my body position at that point – my elbows are my weakness, so that’s the main word I’ll hear from her. I try to be as focused as possible during the warm-up and forget everything else. As soon as I am happy with my warm-up, I might let him relax for a few minutes. Those minutes of silence are important for me, because it makes me calm down for the class. As soon as we set up on the first cone, it’s game on and we’re excited for what’s about to come.


Kendra KöhnenFoto: Christiane Becker

Inhaberin von “Kendra’s”

Katharina Schulze

What does your routine a day before the class look like?

My trainer is Alexander Eck and we are usually quite a big team. If we are done with our classes and took care of our horses, we will talk about the schedule for the upcoming day. We talk about each horse’s class, what needs to be done or prepared and who can help who. We also determine who’s at the barn at what time and who feeds the horses. Depending on the starting point of the first class of the day, we might determine which horses need to be lunged beforehand, which horses need to be ridden or who will just go for a little walk.

If my class is early the next day, I study my pattern at the hotel room, think about my outfit and prepare everything. That way, I can do everything faster in the morning.

What’s your routine in the barn aisle?

It usually starts an hour or an hour and a half before the class. I like to take my time when getting my horse ready, because I want to be relaxed while doing it. I brush off my horse, brush the tail and clean the hooves. Afterwards, I put in the fake tail and apply hoof black or clear.

While the hooves dry, I put on the saddle and the entry numbers. Once that’s done, my horse can eat a little bit of hay while being tied up in its stall. That way, I can get ready and my horse can relax. I will do my hear, my make-up and put on my outfit.

I usually arrive at the warm-up pen 20 or 25 minutes before my go.

What’s your routine in the warm-up pen?

It depends on the event and the whole situation. I try to really just warm up my horse, check on all the manoeuvres and whether my horse is listening. Less is more when it comes to warming up and anything that didn’t work out at home, won’t work out in the warm-up. Just enjoy the show!


Wer hat das als Neueinsteiger nicht erlebt: Man macht sich für die Klasse fertig – und ist viel zu früh da und muss lange warten. Oder noch schlimmer: Nichts läuft wie geplant und man kommt zu spät. Genau aus diesem Grund haben die meisten großen Trainingsställe feste Abläufe, damit alles läuft wie am Schnürchen. Wir haben mit drei Amateur-Reiterinnen über ihre Routine vor der Klasse gesprochen.

Christine Gayko

Foto: Jasmin Ziegler Fotografie

Wie sieht deine Routine am Vorabend aus?

Ehrlich gesagt, habe ich am Abend zuvor nicht wirklich eine Routine. Ich denke, am Tag davor kommt es bei mir immer ganz darauf an, in welcher Verfassung mein Pferd ist. Wenn es tiefenentspannt auf dem Turnier angekommen und cool ist, gehe ich alles ganz entspannt an und konzentriere mich eher darauf, die Pattern zu lernen. Wenn mein Pferd auf der Anlage alles spannend findet und gut Ernergie hat, arbeite ich es natürlich mehr und konzentriere mich darauf, dass ich für den nächsten Tag ein gutes Gefühl habe. Ansonst lerne ich, wie gesagt, die Pattern am Vorabend auf jeden Fall schon einmal, da sich mein Gehirn über die Schlafphase sehr gut Dinge merken kann. 
Gerade vor einer wichtigen Klasse ist natürlich ein gewisses Maß an Vorfreude aber auch Nervosität da. Daher ist es wichtig, dass man sich so viel Stress wie möglich schon im Vorhinein nimmt. Das schafft man zum einen dadurch, dass man sich schon am Vorabend alles parat legt und checkt, ob für den nächsten Tag auch alles da ist, um nicht unnötig suchen zu müssen. Ich würde generell alles vermeiden, was einem kurz vor der Prüfung noch „unnötigen“ Stress macht. 
Ansonsten würde ich aber sagen, gehe ich den Vorabend ganz entspannt an. Dies hat aber sicherlich auch mit einer gewissen Routine zu tun, die man sich über die Jahre einfach angewöhnt. Was in den drei Minuten in der Showarena passiert, kann ich am Abend vorher sowieso nicht mehr beeinflussen. Daher: Gute Vorbereitung ist das A und O und nicht unnötig stressen.

Wie sieht deine Routine in der Stallgasse aus?

In der Stallgasse kommt es bei mir ganz auf das Pferd an. Es gibt Pferde, die reite ich vor der Prüfung einmal und stelle sie dann wieder weg; oder Pferde, die nur ein ganz kurzes Abreiten brauchen oder ein langes. Shiner reite ich im Verhältnis lange ab, was daran liegt, dass er am Ende immer entspannter ist, wenn er schön warm und locker ist. 
Ansonsten habe ich, wie gesagt, schon alles griffbereit vorbereitet. So, dass das eigentliche Fertigmachen nicht lange dauert. Meiner Meinung nach sind es die Kleinigkeiten, die am Ende für Hektik sorgen, oder ob man pünktlich zur Prüfungen ist. Ein gutes Beispiel ist das Befestigen der Startnummer. Wenn möglich, würde ich auch so etwas immer schon früh genug machen. Um beim eigentlichen Fertigmachen für die Show nicht noch unnötig suchen zu müssen.  Aber auch in der Stallgasse beim Fertigmachen habe ich über die Jahre eine Routine aufgebaut. Ganz wichtig ist natürlich der beste TT – liebe Grüße an alle wunderbaren TTs da draußen. Wenn man mit seinem TT eingespielt ist, hat man nach Jahren raus, wie lange man für das Fertigmachen benötigt, dies nimmt natürlich auch viel Stress.

Wie sieht deine Routine im Warm-Up-Pen aus?

Meine Routine im Warm-Up-Pen ist wirklich ganz simpel. Ich reite mein Pferd wirklich nur warm und schaue, dass es so entspannt wie möglich ist. Ganz wichtig ist: Was dein Pferd zuhause nicht kann, wird es auch nicht fünf Minuten vor der Show lernen. Daher bin ich kein Freund davon, kurz vor der Prüfung noch irgendetwas verbessern zu wollen und sich und dem Pferd damit unnötig Stress zu machen. 
Dann kommt es natürlich auf die Prüfung an: Für eine Ranch Riding mache ich natürlich vorher ein paar Manöver. Einfach, damit mein Pferd darauf vorbereitet ist, was kommen wird; genau so mit Stangen vor einem Trail. Da Shiner gerne mal glotzig in der Prüfung ist, schaue ich ob irgendetwas „Spannendes“ in der Showarena steht. Im besten Fall reite ich ihn dort einmal, wenn es möglich ist. Danach hat es sich bei ihm nämlich dann Gott sei Dank erledigt. Das heißt, auch beim Abreiten muss man seine Pferde kennen und eine gewisse Routine auf jedem Pferd individuell aufbauen. 
Wenn möglich, etwa bei einem Trail, gehe ich die Pattern immer ab. Bei anderen Prüfungen gucke ich mir, wenn möglich, die ersten Starter an. Dies hilft mir, die Pattern noch einmal zu verinnerlichen und auf Sachen zu achten, die man auf dem Papier nicht sieht, beispielsweise Hilfslinien anhand von Gegenständen etc.. Wenn man das alles gemacht hat, ist man wirklich gut vorbereitet. Dann heißt es Spaß haben und konzentrieren. 


Kendra KöhnenFoto: Christiane Becker

Inhaberin von “Kendra’s”

Jacqueline Korioth

Wie sieht Deine Routine am Vorabend aus ?

Angefangen wird damit, dass wir uns einen Überblick verschaffen, welche Klasse wann, wie, wo stattfindet und wer eventuell mitgehen kann, zur Unterstützung. Danach wird noch die Startreihenfolge ermittelt. Alles wird auf eine große Tafel geschrieben, die bei uns in der Stallgasse hängt, somit hat jeder einen Plan und kann immer wieder nachsehen. Diese gilt es immer zu aktualisieren.

Wenn beispielsweise am nächsten Morgen eine Showmanship-Klasse ansteht, übe ich einen Abend vorher noch einmal die wesentlichen Punkte der Pattern mit meinem Pferd Style And Perfection, genannt Grisu, wasche noch einmal den Schweif und das Toupet, damit diese frisch und voluminös aussehen. Dazu werden die weißen Füße meines Pferdes noch einmal ordentlich geschrubbt, in der Hoffnung, dass sie über Nacht weiß bleiben. Außerdem mache ich mir schon einmal eine Startnummer an mein Jacket.

Wie sieht Deine Routine in der Stallgasse aus ?

Diejenige, die die erste Klasse am Tag hat, kümmert sich um ihr Pferd und sich, die anderen versorgen die restlichen Pferde, sprich füttern und misten. Als erstes hole ich mein Pferd aus der Box und hänge Grisu kurz an die Longe, um zu schauen, ob er laufen möchte. Danach spritze ich noch einmal seine weißen Beine ab und binde ihn auf der Stallgasse, damit er trocknen kann. Währenddessen putze ich ihn, hänge das Schweiftoupet rein und flechte ihm seinen Schopf ein. Sobald die Füße und Beine trocken sind, cleare ich diese noch und sprühe die Beine gegebenenfalls weiß an. Anschließend lasse ich Grisu auf der Stallgasse stehen und trocknen, meist ist jetzt der Zeitpunkt, an dem ich eine Kleinigkeit esse. Dazu schaue ich, wie ich in der Zeit bin, schaue, ob die Klasse schon angefangen hat, oder ob es Verzögerungen gibt. Danach schminke ich mich und mache mir meinen Dutt. In der Zeit schaut eines der Mädels oder meine Trainerin Stefanie Bubenzer nach Grisu und stellt ihn gegebenenfalls nochmal ans Heu, damit keine schlechte Laune aufkommt. Steffi und die Mädels haben dann für mich im Blick, wie die Zeit ist und ich beeile mich mit dem umziehen: Anzug, Bluse, Halstuch und Hut an. Kurz vor meinem Start halftert mir jemand Grisu auf und holt ihn vom Heu weg, dass ich mich dabei nicht “einsaue”. Dann gehe ich gemeinsam mit Grisu, meist Steffi oder einem der Mädels nach vorne zum Warm-Up. Dabei haben wir dann noch das Grooming Bag, in dem ein Patternheft, etwas zu trinken, eine Bürste und noch sehr viel “Lebenswichtiges” drinnen ist. 

Wie sieht Deine Routine im Warm-Up-Pen aus ?

Als Erstes schaue ich noch einmal nach, wie viele Starter vor mir sind und schätze danach ab, wie viel Zeit ich habe, mich warm zu machen. Meist gehe ich erst einmal Schritt, ohne eingeschnallte Kette, dass Grisu und ich uns warm laufen. Währenddessen schauen Steffi und ich uns ein oder zwei Läufe an und besprechen die Pattern noch einmal: welche Punkte wichtig sind, worauf ich achten soll. Dann schnalle ich die Kette ein und laufe im Showmodus los. Fange an im Schritt, dann Übergänge: Schritt – Trab, Schritt – Halten, Schritt- Halten-Turn, Schritt-Halten-Set Up und aus dem Schritt ins Back Up. Dies mache ich dann noch einmal aus dem Trab. Anschließend nehme ich mir ein paar Elemente aus der Pattern und übe, einen Rhythmus in die Abfolge zu bekommen. Steffi korrigiert meine Körperposition dabei – da ich eine kleine Schwäche habe, meine Ellenbogen in der Taille zu lassen, ist das meist gerufene Wort „Ellbogen!“. Während des Warmlaufens bin ich konzentriert und versuche, mich auf mich und Grisu zu fokussieren und meine Umwelt beiseite zu schieben. Sobald ich mit einer Abfolge, dem Rhythmus und der Manier von Grisu zufrieden bin, lobe ich ihn und lass ihn stehen. Eine gewisse Ruhe vor dem Start muss sein, damit ich gelassen in die Klasse gehen kann und mich nicht unter Strom gesetzt fühle. An der Startpylone, sind Grisu und ich im Showmodus, wir schalten alles um uns aus und sind voll und ganz fokussiert auf das, was als nächstes folgt! 


Kendra KöhnenFoto: Christiane Becker

Inhaberin von “Kendra’s”

Katharina Schulze

Wie sieht deine Routine am Vorabend aus? 

Ich trainiere bei Alexander Eck. Wir fahren meistens in einer relativ großen Gruppe aufs Turnier. Wenn alle Prüfungen eines Tages gelaufen sind, die Pferde versorgt sind und der Zeitplan für den nächsten Turniertag veröffentlicht wurde, sprechen wir gemeinsam den Ablauf des nächsten Tages durch. Hierbei besprechen wir zum Beispiel, welches Pferd wann dran ist, was noch vorbereitet werden muss und wer vor der jeweiligen Prüfung helfen kann. Weiterhin wird festgelegt, wer wann am Stall sein soll und wer morgens die Pferde füttert. Abhängig davon, wann die erste Prüfung ansteht und wie die Pferde drauf sind, besprechen wir auch noch, ob morgens vor der Prüfung longiert wird, geritten wird oder vielleicht eine Runde spazieren gegangen werden soll. 

Wenn ich meinen ersten Start recht früh morgens habe, gehe ich meistens abends im Hotelzimmer auch noch einmal meine Pattern durch, überlege, was ich anziehen möchte und lege mir meine Sachen schon zurecht. So geht morgens alles etwas schneller. 

Wie sieht deine Routine in der Stallgasse aus? 

Meine Routine in der Stallgasse startet meistens etwa ein bis eineinhalb Stunden vor meinem Start. Ich lasse mir beim Pferd fertig machen gerne etwas Zeit, damit alles in Ruhe und ohne Stress vorbereitet werden kann. Zuerst wird ordentlich geputzt, der Schweif gebürstet und die Hufe sauber gemacht. Als nächstes wird das Schweiftoupet reingebaut und anschließend Hufblack oder Hufclear aufgetragen. 

Solange die Hufe trocknen, satteln wir und bauen die Startnummern an das Blanket. Danach stelle ich mein Pferd gerne noch einmal ans Heunetz angebunden in die Box. So kann ich mich in Ruhe fertig machen und mein Pferd sich noch einmal etwas entspannen. Dann kümmere ich mich um meine Haare, schminke mich und ziehe mich um. 

Meistens versuche ich, so 20 bis 25 Minuten vor meinem Start mit dem Abreiten zu beginnen. 

Wie sieht deine Routine im Warm-Up-Pen aus? 

Meine Warm-Up Routine hängt natürlich auch wieder von der jeweils anstehenden Prüfung und der Gesamtsituation auf dem Turnier ab. 

Dennoch versuche ich eigentlich immer nur, mein Pferd schön locker und warm zu haben. Ich prüfe kurz, ob alle Hilfen sitzen und ob ich mein Pferd gut bei mir habe. Meistens ist beim Abreiten weniger mehr und alles, was zu Hause noch nicht funktioniert hat, wird man jetzt auch nicht mehr ändern können. #enjoytheshow

Related Posts