How to: Walk and Execute the Inspection in Showmanship

Picture: Luxcompany GmbH

Direkt zur deutschen Version

It is often underestimated, yet one of the classes that requires a lot of skill: Showmanship is far more than just walking next to a horse. Executing a good inspection and running in a natural yet athletic way is a challenge. We have asked three champions how they mastered that challenge.

Running a Showmanship pattern is entirely different from going for a run. How do you practice that special style of running?

I try to move from the hip downwards and try to not move my shoulders too much. I have practiced with a trainer a lot in the past. It is always good to have someone watching you. If the trainer corrects you, you can change the way you do it and get a feeling of how it should be done right. You can try and recreate that feeling once you practice at home. I also practice on different grounds. It is easier on more solid ground that on deep ground. Whenever I go to the inside arena, it is quite easy, once I practice on the outside arena, it becomes a challenge. 

Any advice for our readers on how to work on one’s posture?

I am trying to include things such as taking back my shoulders and keep my arms close to my body into my daily life. Whenever I walk to a different department at work, I try to walk “Showmanship style”, taking my shoulders back and bending my arms. I watched an Instagram story by glamourgirls_united recently and saw that they used a lead rope to keep arms and shoulders into place. I haven’t tried it yet, but I can imagine that this would be a good exercise.

How important is it to smile during the class?

It is very important. It shows that you are confident and that you love what you do. It also gives a great overall impression. When I started doing Showmanship, smiling didn’t come easy to me. I was so focused on what I had to do, I couldn’t smile as well. Today, I can even smile once something goes wrong.

What do you pay attention to in the cross-overs?

Don’t be too early or too late when crossing sides. It’s easier said than done. Two years ago, they had a Showmanship clinic at the Euro Paint and the clinician told us to think of the inspection as a dance between ringsteward and exhibitor. I always think of that.

What’s a no-go when it comes to running in a Showmanship class or the set-up?

I feel like it is important to not walk with the horse while setting it up. Stay where you are, don’t move towards the horse to set it up. 

Running a Showmanship pattern is entirely different from going for a run. How do you practice that special style of running?

It is entirely different for sure. I try to walk and run during practice as I would in a class. I wouldn’t just jog next to the horse. That way, once you go to a show, you don’t have to change your behavior. Try and walk by yourself at first, leave the horse out of it, until you got everything under control. That way, you don’t have to focus on too many things.

Any advice for our readers on how to work on one’s posture?

I haven’t done Showmanship for a very long time and was lucky enough to start by practicing with a broke Showmanship horse. That way, I could focus on my posture and how I executed the manoeuvres. I didn’t have to pay attention to teaching the horse anything. If you can practice with an experienced horse, take the chance! You can also take a small whip and put it behind your back in order to keep your elbows into place. Take a small object, a piece of paper or anything, and put it in between your waist and your elbow. That way, you can practice to have your elbows close to your body. You can also practice while carrying a tray, that way, your arms will be bent in the right way.

It is always helpful to have someone watch you during practice. You can ask them for advice and to record your run which you can analyze afterwards or send to your trainer.

How important is it to smile during the class?

It is very important, but I don’t manage to do it all the time. I try to smile while approaching the ring steward, without looking too artificial. My goal is to smile throughout the whole run, but I need some more stamina to do so.

What do you pay attention to in the cross-overs?

I want my steps to be the same size and they should be in the same order as well. I do four steps, but you can do more or less, as long as it is the same number every time. I also try to be not too far apart from the horse, so that my elbows are close to my body and I don’t have to stretch my arm. When doing cross-overs, I always face the judge and don’t look at the ground, my chain or the horse. My goal is to do everything a little faster, because if you do things too slow, it can look as if you don’t know what you are doing.

What’s a no-go when it comes to running in a Showmanship class or the set-up?

Try to maintain your posture: stay tall, put your shoulders back, chin up, elbows close to the body, don’t move your shoulders too much. You shouldn’t be too close to the horse, otherwise you might be in trouble in bent shapes, because the horse might step on your feet and – worst of all – you might fall. It is not only important to have your horse set up correctly during the inspection, try to keep your own legs close whenever you stand. 

Running a Showmanship pattern is entirely different from going for a run. How do you practice that special style of running?

First of all, I practice without the horse: elbows close to the body, don’t move your shoulders. I also do a lot of lunge, active my core muscles and try to maintain that tension within those muscles when running. I do forward and backward lunges, little jumps – all to strengthen my core. It is also important to wear the same boots during practice and showing. I also run a lot in the sand, because it is entirely different from running on even ground. Try not to look like a chicken on the run – despite all the tension, you want it to look natural. My advice: Ask someone to record yourself and analyse your run.

Any advice for our readers on how to work on one’s posture?

As I said, you should work on your core stability, especially when standing up. I also jog a lot next to my horse and check myself in the mirror. You can put napkins under your elbows to keep them close to your body. Another piece of advice: Carry your lead chain as you would carry reins when riding two-handed, leave the lead laying on your hands. That is how you can check if your hands are even. You can also put the left hand on the lead chain and carry your other hand in the air. The horse has to react although your right hand is not on the lead chain. That makes practice more fun. And again: Ask someone to record yourself. Practice with the same lead chain you use for showing. Try to roll up the lead in the right way. It is a little thing that can make a difference and you can practice it at home.

How important is it to smile during the class?

This is the last task before you are perfect. I would advise newcomers to focus on doing the manoeuvres correctly, you shouldn’t look mean while doing it, but mastering all this while smiling is a real challenge. I don’t manage to do all of this every time. It is important to smile at the ring steward to show you’re having fun. I feel like all the tension you need to perform this task might make you forget that it is fun. And people can see that. Smile at the beginning and during the set-up. Don’t be artificial, it should be an honest smile that displays confidence and fun.

What do you pay attention to in the cross-overs?

You should present yourself and the horse, just like in the halter. Be proud of yourself and the horse, I always try to remind myself of that. I start with the inner leg when doing the cross-overs. Don’t cross right away, open, then cross. It should have a rhythm and flow. Newcomers might find it easy to count while doing the crossovers. Make sure all your steps are of the same length and number. Your toes should point to the horse. I practice this at home while recording myself to make it look easy and natural. Don’t copy others, find your own style that fits your horse. And again: Wear the boots you’re showing in.

What’s a no-go when it comes to running in a Showmanship class or the set-up?

No-gos when it comes to running: bending your knees too much or pulling them forward, moving your feet too much. Some people’s hands aren’t even or people will just let them fall down on their thighs. That’s a no-go for me. Don’t walk too close to the horse, don’t lean on the chain or pull on it. A no-go in the set-up: putting your feet in the wrong direction, stamping when finishing the cross-overs, over-crossing. Walking in a way that is too artificial is not what they judges want to see anymore. Same goes for nodding when finishing a pattern or during the set-up. Smile to show the ring steward that he or she can start with the inspection. You don’t need to move your head a lot.


Trainingstipps: Set-Up und Laufen in der Showmanship

Oft unterschätzt und doch eine der schwersten Klassen, wenn man auf top Niveau mitlaufen will: Showmanship ist mehr, als nur das Pferd zu führen. Man braucht Körperbeherrschung, Pferdeverständnis und eine natürliche Ausstrahlung. Gerade das Laufen und die Inspektion sind oft unterschätzte Elemente dieser Klasse. Wir haben drei Champions gefragt, wie sie dafür trainieren.

In der Showmanship neben dem trabenden Pferd zu laufen, ist doch etwas anderes als joggen – wie übst du das?

Einerseits versuche ich, nur aus der Hüfte, beziehungsweise den Beinen, zu laufen. Oft sieht man, dass beim Jog viele mit den Schultern “mitlaufen”. Anderseits habe ich in der Vergangenheit viel mit einem Trainer geübt, der von außen einfach besser sieht, wie man sich bewegt. Wenn man es dann direkt korrigiert, spürt man, wie es sich richtig anfühlen sollte. Wenn ich dann alleine übe, versuch ich immer wieder, das gleiche Laufgefühl zu erreichen.
Was mir auch noch hilft, ist, auf verschiedenen Böden zu trainieren. Wenn ich in die Halle fahre und der Boden fester ist, fällt es natürlich leichter, Showmanship zu trainieren. Der Außenplatz in meinem Stall, in dem ich fast täglich trainiere, ist bei Trockenheit sehr leicht und da ist es um einiges anstrengender, zu laufen und Halt zu haben.

Hast du einen Tipp für unsere Leser, wie man an der Haltung arbeiten kann?

Ich habe versucht, gerade so Sachen wie Schultern zurücknehmen und Arme am Körper halten, in mein tägliches normales Laufen miteinzubauen. Wenn ich auf der Arbeit in einen anderen Bereich laufe, nutze ich den Weg, um bewusst meine Schultern zurück zu nehmen, aber auch mit der typischen Showmanship-Armhaltung hat man mich schon über den Gang laufen sehen. Ich habe aber gerade in den letzten Tagen eine Instagram Story von glamourgirls_united gesehen, in der mit einem zusammengebundenen Strick via Oberarme und Rücken eine Begrenzung entstanden ist. Ich habe das noch nie probiert, kann mir aber vorstellen, dass es eine hilfreiche Übung für die Körperhaltung ist. Vielleicht probiere ich es mal.

Wie wichtig ist dir, dass du in der Klasse lächelst?

Extrem wichtig – es zeigt Selbstbewusstsein und dass man Freude an dem, was man macht, hat und rundet am Ende das Gesamtbild ab. Als ich mit der Showmanship angefangen hatte, war das nicht so einfach. Ich war so konzentriert darauf, was ich alles machen und beachten muss und auch einfach super nervös, da ist das Lächeln definitiv zu kurz gekommen. Mittlerweile kann ich sogar weiterlächeln, wenn etwas schief gegangen ist.

Worauf achtest du bei den Cross-overs beim Set-Up besonders?

Nicht zu früh und nicht zu spät zu sein. Das ist einfacher gesagt als getan. Vor zwei oder drei Jahren gab es auf der Euro Paint eine Showmanship-Session. Da wurde den Zuschauern beim Setup und den Cross-overs gesagt: Es ist ein Tanz zwischen dem Ringsteward und dir und der Ringsteward “führt”. Das habe ich versucht, mir zu Herzen zu nehmen.

Was sollte man beim Laufen und beim Set-Up in der Showmanship unbedingt vermeiden?

Also ich finde es wichtig, beim Set-Up und dem Aufstellen vom Pferd nicht mitzulaufen. Also man bleibt wirklich fix da stehen, wo man sich hingestellt hat und geht nicht einen kleinen Schritt vor, wenn sich das Pferd bewegt.

In der Showmanship neben dem trabenden Pferd zu laufen, ist doch etwas anderes als joggen – wie übst du das?

Es ist wirklich komplett etwas anderes. Generell versuche ich, beim Showmanship-Training immer zu laufen, wie ich es in der Prüfung auch machen würde. Es kommt also nicht vor, dass ich einfach neben dem Pferd herjogge. Das hilft mir auch in der Prüfung, weil es dann natürlich keine Umstellung zum Training mehr ist. Manchmal hilft es auch, erst einmal ohne Pferd zu laufen, bis man bei sich sozusagen alles „unter Kontrolle“ hat und erst dann das Pferd dazu nimmt. So muss man sich nicht auf ganz so viele Dinge gleichzeitig konzentrieren.

Hast du einen Tipp für unsere Leser, wie man an der Haltung arbeiten kann?

Ich selbst starte auch noch nicht lange Showmanship und hatte das Glück, am Anfang mit einem erfahrenen Pferd trainieren zu können. So konnte ich mich viel auf mich selbst, meine Haltung und die Ausführung der Manöver konzentrieren und musste nicht zusätzlich darauf achten, dass mein Pferd alle Manöver lernt und richtig umsetzt. Wenn ihr also die Möglichkeit habt, die ersten Male mit einem Pferd zu trainieren, das Showmanship-broke ist – zum Beispiel das eures Trainers oder eurer Freunde – nutzt die Chance!
Aber darüber hinaus gibt es auch noch einige Dinge, die man tun kann: Zum Beispiel könnt ihr euch eine Gerte hinter den Rücken klemmen, damit die Schultern nicht nach vorne kippen, oder ihr legt Bierdeckel zwischen Ellenbogen und Oberkörper, um daran zu arbeiten, dass diese während des Laufens dicht am Körper bleiben. Man kann beim Training auch ein Tablett auf den Händen tragen, das übt die Haltung der Unterarme ungemein. So bleibt der Winkel zwischen Unter- und Oberarm immer so um die 90 Grad, was ich persönlich am Schönsten finde.
Und was natürlich immer hilft, ist, jemanden während des Trainings zuschauen zulassen und sich Tipps zu holen. Alternativ könnt ihr euch auch filmen und das Video anschließend selbst analysieren oder eurem Trainer schicken.

Wie wichtig ist dir, dass du in der Klasse lächelst?

Es ist mir schon ziemlich wichtig, leider klappt das nicht immer so, wie ich es gerne hätte. Aber besonders beim Set-Up und wenn ich auf den Richter zulaufe, achte ich dann darauf, möglichst viel zu lächeln, ohne dass es gequält oder übertrieben unnatürlich aussieht.
Perfekt wäre es, wenn ich das dann noch über den gesamten Lauf halten könnte, aber da brauche ich doch noch etwas mehr Kondition.

Worauf achtest du bei den Cross-overs beim Set-Up besonders?

Vor allem darauf, dass ich immer die gleiche Schrittzahl und -folge laufe. Ich persönlich mache immer vier Schritte, aber im Prinzip ist es, egal wie viele es sind – Hauptsache immer die gleiche Anzahl.
Außerdem bemühe ich mich, nicht zu weit entfernt vom Pferd zu stehen, sondern so, dass meine Ellenbogen weiter fest am Oberkörper liegen und ich den Arm nicht ausstrecken muss.
Und natürlich schaue ich auch während der Cross-overs immer zum Richter und senke nicht den Blick auf den Boden, die Kette oder mein Pferd.
Ich selbst muss bei mir auch noch darauf achten, etwas zügiger zu werden und mir nicht zu viel Zeit zu lassen. Das sieht nämlich immer ein bisschen unsicher aus.

Was sollte man beim Laufen und beim Set-Up in der Showmanship unbedingt vermeiden?

Wichtig ist natürlich, die eigene Haltung während des ganzen Patterns beizubehalten: groß bleiben, Schultern zurück, Kopf hoch, Ellenbogen am Körper und viel Schulterbewegung vermeiden.
Darüber hinaus sollte man verhindern, während des Laufens zu dicht am Pferd zu sein. Andernfalls kann es – besonders in Kurven – schnell passieren, dass das Pferd dir hinten in die Fersen läuft und du im schlimmsten Fall hinfällst.
Im Set-Up ist es nicht nur wichtig, dass das Pferd geschlossen steht. Deshalb vermeide ich breitbeinig zu stehen und habe im Stand immer die Beine geschlossen.

In der Showmanship neben dem trabenden Pferd zu laufen, ist doch etwas anderes als joggen – wie übst du das?

Ja, prinzipiell übe ich erst einmal ohne Pferd zu laufen: Ellenbogen ran, Oberkörper fest, nicht mit den Schultern wackeln. Oft übe ich auch große Ausfallschritte, dass ich dabei meine Bauchmuskulatur anspanne und diese Spannung mit ins Laufen nehme. Ausfallschritte vorwärts, rückwärts, kleine Sprünge – dabei einfach die sogenannte Core Stability trainieren. Es ist wichtig, viel in den Stiefeln zu laufen, die man auch beim Showen trägt und viel auch im Sand. Denn das ist noch einmal ganz anders als auf hartem Boden. Wichtig ist auch, dass man nicht läuft wie ein Storch oder Hühnchen, die auf der Flucht sind – es sollte trotz der Spannung natürlich aussehen. Mein Tipp ist: ganz viel filmen lassen und das dann analysieren!

Hast du einen Tipp für unsere Leser, wie man an der Haltung arbeiten kann?

Wie gesagt, viel allgemeines Fitnesstraining für den Oberkörper und die Bauchmuskulatur, gerade im Stehen. Was ich auch viel mache, ist viel neben dem Pferd joggen und im Spiegel kontrollieren. Man kann sich auch zwei Servietten unter die Ellenbogen klemmen, damit man die Ellenbogen ranlässt. Was auch viel hilft ist, wenn man die Führleine wie eine Zügelbrücke auf den Daumen liegen lässt – so kann man kontrollieren, ob die Hände auf der selben Höhe sind. Um das Pferd auf die Hände zu schulen, kann man die Führleine auch mal nur in die linke Hand nehmen und die rechte Hand in der Luft halten. Das Pferd muss auf die lose Hand reagieren. So kann man auch ein wenig Variation ins Training bringen. Aber auch hier: viel filmen lassen, viel mit der Kette üben, mit der man auch showt. Rollt das Leder ordentlich auf, das sind so kleine Dinge, mit denen man in der Klasse punkten kann und die man zuhause gut üben kann.

Wie wichtig ist dir, dass du in der Klasse lächelst?

Ganz ehrlich, zu lächeln ist die letzte Aufgabe, bevor man perfekt ist. Gerade Anfänger sollten anfangs erst einmal darauf achten, dass sie die Manöver korrekt machen – natürlich sollte man dabei nicht verbissen aussehen. Aber alles so gut zu können und dann automatisch zu lächeln, ist wirklich eine Herausforderung – und ich schaffe es auch nicht immer. Wichtig ist, dass man immer den Ringsteward beim Set-Up anlächelt – einfach, um zu zeigen, dass man Spaß hat. Oft passiert es, dass man in der Showmanship, wenn man so viel Körperspannung halten muss, den Spaß verliert. Und das sieht man. Also lächelt am Anfang, während des Set-Ups. Nicht aufgesetzt, nicht affektiert, ein ehrliches Lächeln, das Selbstvertrauen und Spaß zeigt.

Worauf achtest du bei den Cross-Overs beim Set-Up besonders?

Prinzipiell ist es am wichtigsten, dass man sich und das Pferd vorstellt – wie in der Halter. Man sollte stolz auf sich und das Pferd sein und so versuche ich auch, in die Cross-Overs zu gehen. Ich starte immer mit dem inneren Bein. Nicht zuerst überkreuzen, sondern öffnen und dann überkreuzen. Wichtig ist, dass das Ganze rhythmisch ist. Daher ist es für Anfänger sinnvoll, dabei auch zu zählen. Dann sind die Schritte auch gleich. Die Schritte sollten der eigenen Schrittlänge und der des Pferdes angepasst sein. Die Fußstellung ist auch wichtig: Die Füße sollten immer zum Pferd zeigen. Ich würde das zuhause auch viel mithilfe eines Videos üben. Das mache ich auch: Einfach, dass sich das Ganze natürlich anfühlt und nicht affektiert. Man darf auch nicht zu sehr darauf achten, was andere machen, und das dann imitieren, sondern es sollte zum eigenen Typ und zum Pferd passen. Und auch hier: Tragt die Schuhe, in denen ihr showt!

Was sollte man beim Laufen und beim Set-Up in der Showmanship unbedingt vermeiden?

No-Gos beim Laufen sind für mich: extrem in die Knie gehen, extrem die Knie vorziehen, extremes Schmeißen der Fersen. Viele haben die Hände nicht auf derselben Höhe oder legen sie am Oberschenkel ab und joggen einfach. Das ist ein No-Go für mich. Gutes Schuhwerk ist wichtig, damit man einen guten Halt hat und natürlich gehen kann. Man sollte stabil laufen, nicht zu nah am Pferd laufen und sich auf keinen Fall an der Kette festhalten oder sogar ziehen. No-Gos im Set-Up sind für mich: falsche Fußstellung, Aufstampfen nach dem Stehenbleiben – also ein extremes Abschließen der Cross-Overs, das schon fast an einen Militärgruß erinnert – extremes Überkreuzen im Cross-Over oder Starten mit unterschiedlichen Füßen. Auch affektiertes Laufen im Set-Up ist nicht schön und das will man auch nicht mehr sehen. Dasselbe gilt für ein Abnicken am Ende der Pattern oder im Set-Up. Ein schönes Lächeln reicht aus, um dem Ringsteward zu signalisieren, dass er oder sie mit der Inspection beginnen kann. Man muss keine extreme Kopfbewegung machen.

Related Posts